The cold does not bother her anyway
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The cold does not bother her anyway

On her desk, Gunjan Silwal is engrossed in her computer, analyzing glacier mass balance data, working on figures and graphs which to the untrained eyes look rather like scribblings on a toddler’s drawing book. But to the trained eyes, these are essential records of how much mass has been added or reduced over the years […]

Sustainable Tourism in the Daisetsuzan National Park
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Sustainable Tourism in the Daisetsuzan National Park

Daisetsuzan National Park (DNP), located in central Hokkaido, a northernmost island of Japan, is Japan’s largest national park (226,764 hectares). Residents in the city of Sapporo with 2 million populations can access the park area in 2.5 to 3 hours by car, and can enjoy hiking/trekking and hot springs in the park’s volcanic landscape (Fig. […]

Into the Hidden Valley: On a Quest for High Mountain Data
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Into the Hidden Valley: On a Quest for High Mountain Data

I assume most glaciologists would have interesting stories to share about their work: the experience of studying glaciers, their research findings, and their line of work in general. But while we’re in the field, carrying on a conversation is last thing on our minds.  Most recently, I travelled to Rikha Samba for the annual 2016 […]

Wild Nettle – a history and empowerment for women
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Wild Nettle – a history and empowerment for women

Reminiscing a conversation with her grandmother, Kala Kumari, a Kulung woman said, “according to our grandmother the first plant we ate was nettle and during a time of which lasted for a year in the 70’s, we survived because of nettle.” Nettle plant grows throughout Nepal. The Kulung community values nettle both as plant and […]

Two new research organizations in mountain studies have been established in Japan during the cherry blossom season
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Two new research organizations in mountain studies have been established in Japan during the cherry blossom season

April might be the most important month in the Japanese year, not only because of the cherry blossom season but for starting a new semester. In April 2017, two new research organizations have been established regarding mountain studies in Japan – “Master degree program of mountain studies” and “Mountain Science Center (MSC)”. After a Japanese […]

Ecological Calendars and Climate Adaptation in the Pamirs
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Ecological Calendars and Climate Adaptation in the Pamirs

What are Ecological Calendars? Calendars enable us to anticipate future conditions and plan activities. Ecological calendars keep track of time by observing seasonal changes in our habitat (Fig. 1). The nascence of a flower, emergence of an insect, arrival of a migratory bird, breakup of ice, or last day of snow cover – each is […]

Naubise farmer finds relief in climate smart practices
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Naubise farmer finds relief in climate smart practices

Farmer Sita Neupane is the talk of the town this summer. Ms Neupane earned a whopping NPR 70,000, selling cucumbers from her vegetable patch that roughly spans 375 square metres. And, she did it all without using any chemical pesticides on her vegetable farm in Naubise, Mahadevstan-7 of Kavre Palanchowk District, Nepal. Ms Neupane attributes […]

Mountain Sentinels in action: Asia
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Mountain Sentinels in action: Asia

The Mountain Sentinels Collaborative Network takes a social-ecological systems perspective, where the emergent system properties are greater than the sum of its parts. While this systems perspective is one our guiding principles, in some cases, the parts are really, really interesting by themselves. Below are condensed statements from representatives of the Mountain Sentinels’ community regarding […]

Japan’s “Exquisite and Well Conserved” mountain springs
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Japan’s “Exquisite and Well Conserved” mountain springs

Mountain springs: How do we manage the water cycle? Thirty years ago, the Japanese Ministry of the Environment selected one hundred Exquisite and Well Conserved Waters (called “meisui” in Japanese, meaning “good water” in short) to promote the conservation of aquatic ecosystems and to raise awareness about their importance. In 2008, 100 more waters were […]

The aesthetics of earthquake reconstruction in Nepal
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The aesthetics of earthquake reconstruction in Nepal

When I visited Nepal half a year after the devastating 2015 earthquake, no reconstruction had been initiated. Villagers lived in temporary sheds raised on the ruins of their dwellings and concentrated efforts on saving the harvest, giving first priority to food security. They waited for the government to distribute the promised NPR 300,000 (USD 3,000) […]