About Me

AfroMont is an African mountain research network that is coordinated by Dr Sue Taylor, a development specialist with experience in biodiversity conservation. Sue has a strong interest in how climate change will impact on biodiversity, ecosystems, protected areas and African human society – and in particular, the communication of these issues to a wider audience.

Artisanal gold mining threatens Chimanimani National Park
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Artisanal gold mining threatens Chimanimani National Park

A new threat to an African mountain system The southern African mountain research and NGO fraternity have just learned of a potential new threat to the Chimanimani National Park in Zimbabwe. A very small notice appeared in the Zimbabwe Financial Gazette on the 17 July 2017 saying that the Zimbabwean government is planning to ‘release […]

Listening to the Voice of Nature as it Echoes from an Adaptation Retreat
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Listening to the Voice of Nature as it Echoes from an Adaptation Retreat

By Felix Donkor and Christopher Mabeza Anthropogenic climate change has been given different accolades from being a “wicked problem” (Rittel and Webber, 1973) to a “super wicked problem” (Levin, 2012). A common denominator in both descriptions is that climate change, due to its hyper-complexity, defies simplistic or straightforward planning responses. Consequently, as we grapple with […]

Conservation Award for Africa
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Conservation Award for Africa

Dr Ian Little from the South African Endangered Wildlife Trust receives 2017 Whitley Award Dr Ian Little from the South African Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), seen here receiving his Whitley award from HRM Princess Ann, was one of the prestigious winners this year for his determined efforts to protect grasslands in South Africa. Ian is […]

‘Academic conference tourism’ allows delegates to understand mountain issues first hand
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‘Academic conference tourism’ allows delegates to understand mountain issues first hand

Introduction I have had the privilege to visit many unusual places by attending research conferences, an activity I jokingly call ‘academic tourism’.  Perhaps the Mt Kili-AfroMont mountain research conference could be considered an ‘academic tourism’ event in that, as well as the science meeting, it gave delegates an opportunity to see and share information about […]

Exploring the Aberdare Mountains in Kenya
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Exploring the Aberdare Mountains in Kenya

This post was written by Dr. Lydia Olaka. She is a member of the Department of Geology at the University of Nairobi, with research interests related to water: hydrological and groundwater dynamics, tracing geogenic pollution in groundwater, paleoclimate reconstructions, climate variability and multi-disciplinary interaction between science and society.   Fieldwork is very special to me because […]

Is Table Mountain in South Africa a sustainably managed mountain?
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Is Table Mountain in South Africa a sustainably managed mountain?

One of the challenges of our time is to achieve sustainable development, that is, to create human development at the same time as reducing the impact on the natural environment. To this end, ways are being sought to manage mountains sustainably, yet researchers interested in mountain governance struggle to identify good examples of ‘sustainably managed […]

Agricultural impacts in African mountain landscapes and the Land Matrix database
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Agricultural impacts in African mountain landscapes and the Land Matrix database

Researching Large Scale Land Acquisitions and their impacts on African mountains A PhD research study by Kablan Effossou is being driven by the Land Matrix Initiative at the University of Pretoria and aims to find innovative new ways to use the Land Matrix database (http://www.landmatrix.org/) of large scale land acquisitions (LSLA) to explore agricultural impacts […]

What lies hidden, beneath and within
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What lies hidden, beneath and within

Mountains are more than just rock We often think of mountains in terms of rocks, geological upheavals, massive rock folding, cliffs, traverses, north faces, tree lines, alpine vegetation, rain, snow, wetlands, glaciers and those very important ‘water towers’ – everything to do with the outside of the mountains. We seldom consider what is inside or […]

Teaching catchment and river management in the Drakensbergs
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Teaching catchment and river management in the Drakensbergs

Erosion is a major problem in the Drakensberg and foothills I have always been interested in catchment and river management and this interest grew from my widespread experience as a mountaineer and hiker, and during my Master’s degree in Regional Planning.  In addition, over the last fourteen years, I have worked as a lecturer in […]

2016 WUN workshop: Compelling new issues for old African mountains
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2016 WUN workshop: Compelling new issues for old African mountains

African mountain researchers are adventurous people. African mountain researchers will walk miles in 50 degree Celsius temperatures to fly a drone that films geological fault lines in the Rift Valley. They will spend years in a Massai village near Mt Kilimanjaro eating blood and porridge to study life in an African pastoralist culture. They will […]