MtnClim 2016: Serious Science in an Informal Mountain Setting
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MtnClim 2016: Serious Science in an Informal Mountain Setting

A central activity of CIRMOUNT is to sponsor the biennial Mountain Climate Conferences – MtnClim. MtnClim conferences aspire to advance sciences related to climate and its interaction with physical, ecological, and social systems of western North American (and beyond) mountains by providing a forum for communicating current research; promoting active integration among disciplines and of […]

Exploring the Aberdare Mountains in Kenya
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Exploring the Aberdare Mountains in Kenya

This post was written by Dr. Lydia Olaka. She is a member of the Department of Geology at the University of Nairobi, with research interests related to water: hydrological and groundwater dynamics, tracing geogenic pollution in groundwater, paleoclimate reconstructions, climate variability and multi-disciplinary interaction between science and society.   Fieldwork is very special to me because […]

Barbeque is not on the menu
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Barbeque is not on the menu

With autumn well on its way in the Northern Hemisphere, this is a perfect time to share one of our autumn field stories from the top of the world: Lapland. Hurry inside and grab your warmest blanket, this story is going to be chilly! On the 5th of September, a late summer heat wave was […]

Managing bark beetle impacts on ecosystems and society
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Managing bark beetle impacts on ecosystems and society

When I visit mountain landscapes, I feel that I am absorbed by a deep sense of time, where slow geologic and ecological processes prevail. Over the course of my life, I’ve been attracted again and again to these landscapes for their solitude where I can savor a few moments to bask in their timelessness. I […]

Glacier Countries Help the Paris Agreement Enter into Force
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Glacier Countries Help the Paris Agreement Enter into Force

Small Glacier Countries Take a Big Step On October 5, several small mountain countries with glaciers—Austria, Bolivia, and Nepal—undertook an important step in advancing global action on climate change. They helped the Paris Agreement reach the threshold to enter into force and become legally binding. This Agreement, the outcome of the UNFCCC COP21 last November, […]

If you have sore legs, is it a mountain?
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If you have sore legs, is it a mountain?

From camp to ‘The Ridge’, we had hiked half a mile and gained about 500 feet (~150 m) elevation. We were standing on land that had been under ice less than a couple thousand years ago and Russell Glacier and the Greenland Ice Sheet was just a mile or two away. We were at 1,300 […]

Slow or fast change in alpine tundra? A Yukon story unfolds!
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Slow or fast change in alpine tundra? A Yukon story unfolds!

Each time I crest the ridge at the top of the Wolf Creek watershed, I am amazed to find myself in such a wild and beautiful landscape, just a few kilometres south of Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada.  Although I have been travelling to this alpine landscape for almost 20 years, I continue to be struck by […]

Is Table Mountain in South Africa a sustainably managed mountain?
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Is Table Mountain in South Africa a sustainably managed mountain?

One of the challenges of our time is to achieve sustainable development, that is, to create human development at the same time as reducing the impact on the natural environment. To this end, ways are being sought to manage mountains sustainably, yet researchers interested in mountain governance struggle to identify good examples of ‘sustainably managed […]