Africa and “Ecological Infrastructure”
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Africa and “Ecological Infrastructure”

Fragmented management Mountain management in Africa is often a case of the left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing. Currently, African mountains are managed by a suite of individual government departments that typically work in isolation. For example, there may be a Catchment Management Agency working to regulate mountain catchments, and a […]

The Pacific: Missing in action at Perth III?
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The Pacific: Missing in action at Perth III?

The Perth III: Mountains of our Future Earth conference was notable for the absence of Pacific researchers. Pies summarising the geographical representation of the 400+ conference presentations in 2010 and in 2015 showed that Pacific participation remained steady at a feeble 1% (Plate 1). In 2015, I and a single researcher from New Zealand were […]

Competition on the climate escalator
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Competition on the climate escalator

If you want to see evidence of climate change, mountains are pretty good places to look – probably the most striking examples are photos showing the dramatic retreat of glaciers. Another is the steady advance of animals and plants to higher elevations as the climate there becomes increasingly suitable for them. Like commuters on an […]

Challenges and opportunities of developing Environmental Decision Support Systems
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Challenges and opportunities of developing Environmental Decision Support Systems

Effective management of natural resources requires tools that help key stakeholders to foresee the impacts of their investments and actions. Environmental decision support systems can help policy makers and practitioners target key areas embedded in rapid land use change dynamics, monitor stakeholders’ interventions at different scales, and support land use planning by aligning conservation and […]

The social dynamics of mountain systems: Q&A at Perth III with Courtney Flint
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The social dynamics of mountain systems: Q&A at Perth III with Courtney Flint

Courtney, you’re attending the Mountains of our Future Earth conference this week. As a social scientist, what are your expectations of the conference? Courtney Flint – I am very much looking forward to the Perth Mountain Conference! There’s a lot of good energy these days about integrating diverse experiences and expertise from around the world to better […]

“Mountains for Europe’s Future”:  Support us toward the finish line in Brussels!
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“Mountains for Europe’s Future”: Support us toward the finish line in Brussels!

The working group of the strategic research agenda “Mountains for Europe’s Future” prepares for the final spurt towards Brussels. Our short-term aim is to get more mountain research topics into the 2018-20 calls of Horizon 2020, while our long-term goal is to increase the awareness of the importance of mountains for all of Europe. Towards […]

Safe Havens: Refugia for Climate Adaptation
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Safe Havens: Refugia for Climate Adaptation

When I was young, my family owned a log cabin on the Deschutes National Forest of eastern Oregon. Situated in the rain-shadow of the Cascade Mountains, our cabin was nestled in an old-growth forest of “yellow-belly” ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa). I loved the dry character of that forest, the jigsaw-puzzle stems, sun-drenched open canopies, and […]

Q&A at Perth III with Hans Hurni
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Q&A at Perth III with Hans Hurni

(This interview was originally posted on FutureEarth.org and is courtesy of Lizzie Sayer) You’re speaking at the Mountains of our Future Earth conference. Could you tell us some more about what you’ll be presenting? Hans Hurni – At Perth, I will speak about Ethiopia, a paradigmatic example of land degradation in a mountain area that has been […]

Understanding glaciers through indigenous cultures
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Understanding glaciers through indigenous cultures

Climate change is viewed as an economic, political, and physical problem. But a study in WIREs Climate Change by Elizabeth A. Allison (found here) shows that there is a mental aspect to climate change that is being ignored by the major communities invested in the issue: the spiritual and religious importance of glaciers to mountain […]